Monitor Your Body Age With TrakCoach 1.4

Our latest release of TrakCoach 1.4 can now estimate your body age and track changes in your fitness, automatically!

Recovery Rate (or Heart Rate Recovery) is the speed at which your heart rate returns to normal after exercise, and is considered a good measure of your cardiac efficiency. In general, the faster your heart rate returns to normal the fitter you are.

TrakCoach measures Recovery Rate by calculating the difference between highest heart rate (above 80% max) during an intense interval and lowest heart rate (below recovery threshold) following 2 minutes of rest. Based on the Enhanced Medical Care method, if Recovery Rate is >=66 bpm then your body age is much younger than your calendar age, 59-65 bpm then your body age is moderately younger than your calendar age, 53-58 bpm then your body age is slightly younger than your calendar age, 22-52 bpm then your body age is about the same as your calendar age, and <22 bpm then your body age is slightly older than your calendar age.

Finally, using Recovery Rate as a measure of fitness, your fastest Recovery Rate from each workout is used to draw the red trend line under the Profile tab. A line-of-best-fit (blue line) through this trend line accurately measures your change in fitness over time.

Already using TrakCoach in your high-intesity training? Then tell us what you think of body age and fitness change by leaving a comment.

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  1. Hi John, I just had a few questions for you as follows –

    I’ve been tracking my HR with strength work also and it is interesting that there is a significant rise in HR when I do strengths work. In saying this, most of my strength sessions start off with some type of cardio so my heart rate is above resting heart rate anyway.

    Any recommendations for how I could use this information regarding improving my overall explosiveness (power / speed) as well as cardio vascular? Pretty much this is what I need for Muay Thai.

    My understanding is I could keep HR low and do big singular explosive lifts as a means of training anerobic fitness.
    Is there any exercises which I could have a higher HR? I understand how I could keep my HR consistently high with running but how could I do this / or would I want to do this with strength work also?

    • Hi Jason,

      Thanks again for sharing some excellent questions.

      Yes! Heart rate tracking can help your strength training too. Strength workouts typically involve explosive power and speed movements. So tracking intensity and recovery over time should help you improve anaerobic fitness and thereby Muay Thai performance. This is exactly what we designed Trakcoach to do.

      “Any recommendations for how I could use this information regarding improving my overall explosiveness (power / speed) as well as cardio vascular? Pretty much this is what I need for Muay Thai.”

      First, you’ll get best results by determining your true Max HR, rather than using 220-age. Then when performing your power exercises, try to extend rep ranges until you hit anaerobic HR (beware exertion/HR lag). Also give yourself enough rest between sets by waiting until HR gets back under recovery. Over time you should be aiming to improve your workouts and observe gradual increase in your average intensity/effort and anaerobic fitness (ie. shorter recovery rate times). This trend data is shown in the profile window.

      “My understanding is I could keep HR low and do big singular explosive lifts as a means of training anerobic fitness.”

      If your HR remains low then you’re not really doing explosive lifts! Assuming heavy loads in low rep range, practise good form and timing to push your HR into anaerobic zone (say >80% max). Rest and repeat. Then yeah, you’ll be training (and improving) anaerobic fitness!

      “Is there any exercises which I could have a higher HR? I understand how I could keep my HR consistently high with running but how could I do this / or would I want to do this with strength work also?”

      Goes without saying, you should always aim for anaerobic HR during strength workouts. Otherwise you’re just spinning wheels. Any compound exercises that target prime moving muscles like quads/glutes/back will push HR into anaerobic territory in short time. Some classic examples are squats, deadlifts, snatches, chins, box jumps, sled pushes, etc. Always warmup well, master good technique, and progress loads gradually. Hiring a good strength coach for a few weeks may help to master technique faster and avoid injury.

      Let us know how you go!

      John.

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